Public Relations and Marketing Blog

Gershow Recycling Sponsors Medford Chamber of Commerce’s Memorial Day BBQ

Local war veterans pose in front of the new barbecue grill purchased by Gershow Recycling for the Medford Chamber of Commerce’s Memorial Day BBQ at Medford Memorial Park on May 30. Pictured (left to right): Paul Donoghue, President, Medford Chamber of Commerce; Walter Maresco, Commander, American Legion Commander and Post Chaplain; Niel Marturiello, Post Commander; and Matt Pereira, Adjutant, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #2937.

In support of the local community, Gershow Recycling sponsored the Medford Chamber of Commerce’s Memorial Day BBQ, which was held on May 30 at Medford Memorial Park. Gershow sponsored the band and covered the cost of a new barbecue grill for the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #2937.

Gershow has nine locations in Brooklyn, New Hyde Park, Valley Stream, Freeport, Lindenhurst, Huntington Station, Bay Shore, Medford and Riverhead. For more information, call (631) 289-6188 or visit www.gershow.com.

###

* Photo is attached.

About Gershow Recycling

Started in 1964 by Sam Gershowitz, Gershow Recycling began as a two-man operation with a tractor and trailer, a boom truck and the first portable car flattener. Now with the second generation carrying on the legacy, Gershow generates over 750 jobs, contributing millions of dollars to the local economy, while helping to preserve Long Island’s environment. Gershow Recycling takes aluminum, brass, copper, steel, cast iron, appliances, cars and vehicles. In keeping with its philosophy of “Conserving the Future by Recycling the Past,” Gershow Recycling purchases scrap metal that would have otherwise wound up in local landfills, and turns them into high-quality scrap products for recycling. The company produces both ferrous and non-ferrous products.

Mayor Dorman Honors Those Who Sacrificed Their Lives at Wreath Laying Ceremony

Allan M. Dorman (front row, fourth from right), Mayor, Village of Islandia, poses with members of the Col. Francis S. Midura Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #12144, the Korean War Veterans Association, Central Long Island Chapter and the Central Islip Fire Department at a wreath laying ceremony in honor of Memorial Day on May 28.

On May 28, local elected officials, war veterans, residents and members of the Col. Francis S. Midura Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #12144 and the Central Islip Fire Department joined Allan M. Dorman, Mayor, Village of Islandia, for a special Memorial Day wreath laying ceremony at the Veterans Memorial Triangle. The ceremony honored those who sacrificed their lives for this country.

For more information, call 631-348-1133, or visit www.newvillageofislandia.com.

# # #

 

Incorporated in 1985, the Village of Islandia is home to over 3,000 residents and over 1,300 businesses. The village’s proximity to New York City and the North and South shores of Long Island makes Islandia an attractive destination for residents and businesses who may be thinking of relocating to Long Island. For more information, please visit http://www.newvillageofislandia.com.

Frank Boulton Discusses the Formation of the Long Island Ducks and the Atlantic League at LIMBA

Frank Boulton (second from right), Founder/CEO/Owner, Long Island Ducks, was the guest speaker at the LIMBA (Long Island Metro Business Action) meeting at Fairfield Properties Ballpark, home of the Ducks, on May 6. Also pictured (left to right): Al Vitters and Ken Nevor, Board Members, and Ernie Fazio, Chairman, LIMBA; and James Gaughran, New York State Senator.

On May 6, Frank Boulton, Founder/CEO/Owner, Long Island Ducks, was the guest speaker at the LIMBA (Long Island Metro Business Action) meeting at Fairfield Properties Ballpark in Central Islip. During the presentation, he talked about the formation of the Ducks and the league in which it plays, the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball.

Before becoming involved as a baseball team owner, he worked for the financial firms Smith Barney and UBS Securities. In the mid-1980s, he bought the New York Yankees’ minor-league Class-A team in Prince William County, Va., and the Class-AA Albany Colonie Yankees.

During the Major League Baseball strike in 1994, he went down to Homestead, Florida to look at some prospects. “I came up with the idea of a boutique league with 200 of the best unsigned players,” Mr. Boulton said. “That’s how the Atlantic League came about.”

In 1993, Bud Harrelson, who played and managed with the New York Mets, teamed up with Mr. Boulton to form the Wilmington Blue Rocks. Then, from 1997 to 2000, the duo worked tirelessly to bring the Long Island Ducks to life.

Since its formation, the team has won nine divisional titles and been in the playoffs for 15 of the last 17 years. This year’s 27-man roster consists of eleven former MLB players and eight other players with AAA experience. Mr. Boulton said he wants to keep the Ducks as a local team, with local players on the roster. “If they are from Long Island, they’ll get the call,” he said.

One of the disadvantages of owning a minor league baseball team, Mr. Boulton said, is that the roster can change in an instant when a major-league team wants to buy a player’s contract. This past season, eleven Ducks players had their contracts purchased. He said it could happen the night of a game, and the starting pitcher could get the call.

The team plays 132 games in 2022 over 150 days; 66 of them are home games. The ballpark seats 6,002 people, with 20 luxury boxes, a picnic area that can hold up to 300 people, a party deck and a restaurant that seats 125 people. Since its inception, the team has welcomed nearly 8.5 million people to its games, many of whom are repeat fans. Funding for the stadium came from $22.5 million in federal funds, $14.5 million from the Empire State Development Corporation, $5 million from Suffolk County and $3.5 million from Mr. Boulton himself.

Mr. Boulton added that the revenue generated by the Ducks comes from ticket sales (single-game, season and mini-game packages), food and beverage sales. He said that group ticket sales are “a big part of our business.” Further, the Ducks are the only team in the Atlantic League that doesn’t charge its patrons for parking.

In addition to serving as the team’s Founder, CEO and Owner, Mr. Boulton is Chairman of the QuackerJack Foundation, the charitable arm of the Ducks. He is a member of the Suffolk County Sports Hall of Fame, the Bay Shore High School Hall of Fame, and the Long Island Business Hall of Fame. He has received numerous honors from many business and nonprofit organizations. He is a graduate of Villanova University and a resident of Brightwaters.

For more information about upcoming LIMBA programs, visit https://limba.net.

###

 

About LIMBA

Since 1968, LIMBA (Long Island Metro Business Action) has been Long Island’s catalyst for economic investment and improvement, sponsoring lively breakfast forums featuring Long Island business activists and government officials. Its mission is to promote and address issues that affect the quality of life on Long Island. For more information, call (631) 757-1698 or visit www.limba.net.

LIMBA Members Tour Caithness Long Island Energy Center Power Plant in Yaphank

On April 1, Ross Ain, President of Caithness Long Island, LLC, and Bill Wareham, Plant Manager, Siemens Energy, which manages the Caithness Long Island Energy Center, hosted a presentation and guided tour of the state-of-the-art natural gas-fired power plant. During the presentation, they took turns discussing the plant’s technology upgrades, efficiency and emissions.

Tim German (center), Operations Manager, Siemens, guides a group of LIMBA (Long Island Metro Business Action) members through a tour of the Caithness Long Island Energy Center power plant in Yaphank on April 1. The tour followed a presentation by Ross Ain, President of Caithness Long Island, LLC, and Bill Wareham, Plant Manager, Siemens Energy, Inc.

In 2003, the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) issued a Request for Proposal to provide power for its customers. Two years later, Caithness was chosen. Construction of the 350-megawatt plant began in 2007 and came online in 2009.

“Thanks to advances in power generation, we are able to produce more energy with fewer greenhouse gas emissions than a comparable plant utilizing outdated technology,” Mr. Ain said.

Caithness currently has a 20-year agreement with LIPA to provide energy to its customers. “We guarantee availability and efficiency,” Mr. Ain said, adding that, between 2009 and 2021, LIPA customers saved $426 million in fuel and other costs. Further, Caithness reduced CO2 emissions by 440,000 tons a year — a reduction of 36%.

The Yaphank plant generates 21% of the electricity on Long Island. The plant features an air-cooled condenser that uses less than 20 gallons of water per minute — far less than what other power plants on Long Island use. “That is because we are the most efficient, cleanest plant and we operate around the clock since it is the most efficient plant of its kind on Long Island,” Mr. Ain said. “We also have an excellent environmental record, operating well below strict permit limits. We are also very safety-conscious; we have never had an accident.”

The new gas turbines are very fast, Mr. Wareham said, in that they can start up and provide full power within half an hour. The plant is operationally flexible and can run on natural gas or distillate fuel oil.

The plant currently has a roster of 19 full-time employees. It is set 100 feet above sea level, adding a high level of storm protection against flooding, according to Mr. Ain. There is also a large buffer zone that separates Caithness from the residential areas which are approximately one-half mile away. “There are no wetlands here and there are no parks, rivers or endangered species on the premises,” he said.

In addition, Mr. Ain said, Caithness gives back to the community. Each year, the power producer gives out $25,000 in scholarships to students from Patchogue-Medford, Bellport and Longwood High Schools, and supports several community-based groups, including the Boys and Girls Club.

After the presentation, LIMBA members took a tour of the facility.

For more information about upcoming LIMBA programs, visit https://limba.net/.

###

* Photo is attached.

About LIMBA
Since 1968, LIMBA (Long Island Metro Business Action) has been Long Island’s catalyst for economic investment and improvement, sponsoring lively breakfast forums featuring Long Island business activists and government officials. Its mission is to promote and address issues that affect the quality of life on Long Island. For more information, call (631) 757-1698 or visit www.limba.net.

Long Island Real Estate Investor Starts His Business from the Ground Up at an Early Age

Levi Kushnir Flipped and Sold His First House at the Age of 19

VALLEY STREAM, NEW YORK — Ever since he got his start in the real estate industry in 2012, Levi Kushnir has exhibited the drive and hustle needed to succeed in the tumultuous real estate market. His hard work paid off and he soon formed his own company that is a reflection of his success.

Levi Kushnir

His company, Stable Holdings, and its predecessor raised tens of millions of dollars and sold several hundred properties. “After some time with other firms, I decided to branch out on my own,” he said. “Since branching out, I have never been more successful.”

Mr. Kushnir began his real estate career at the age of 18 as an intern with First Meridian Mortgage in Brooklyn. His responsibilities included selling and closing loans in the secondary market. “I was able to quickly learn the business and, six months later, they promoted me to Salesperson,” he said. “As a result, I brought in my first deal when I was still an intern and closed my first mortgage.”

When he was 19 years old, Mr. Kushnir flipped his first home. He bought a three-family house in Elmont for the purpose of making renovations to the house and selling it for a profit. He used $35,000 of his own money, borrowed $50,000 from a relative and the balance from a private lender. “As part of the deal, I would pay him a generous rate of return and a portion of my profits, and he agreed,” he said.

After making the renovations, he put the house on the market. Months went by and there were no buyers. “I had to take out a cash-out refinance and continued to pay my investor before I could pay myself,” Mr. Kushnir said.

He soon had a buyer for the house. They worked out a rent-to-own agreement and settled on a purchase price. “Everything worked out in the end and that is how I closed my first deal,” Mr. Kushnir said. “I was able to pay back my investor and put some extra money in my pocket.”

Mr. Kushnir attributes his success to several factors. First, he does not pressure his clients into making a deal. Second, he makes it a point to meet with his clients personally; no matter how busy he may be, Mr. Kushnir will make his clients feel that they are his only priority. Lastly, he is honest and direct with the people he deals with; if he learns of any issues with the property or the transaction, he will let his clients know immediately.

The main challenge for Mr. Kushnir is to find available properties for investment opportunities. “As an investor, you have to work harder to find properties to purchase and execute with precision to avoid supply chain issues and cost overruns and ensure you can find sellable properties in the market before there are any possible drops in inventory and rising home prices.”

For more information, visit www.stableholdings.com.

###

 

About Stable Holdings

Founded in 2019, Stable Holdings is a real estate development firm based in Valley Stream, New York. The company purchases, renovates and sells properties and land. In addition, Stable Holdings negotiates with buyers and sellers of properties, managing and coordinating full renovations and all aspects of renovations and construction. Stable Holdings was founded by Levi Kushnir, a real estate investor who got his start in the business when he was 18. Under Mr. Kushnir’s leadership, Stable Holdings has raised and invested in more than $10 million in real estate properties. For more information, visit www.stableholdings.com.

Gershow Recycling Donates the Use of 30 Cars for the Chuck Varese Vehicle Extrication Tournament

First Long Island Tournament of Its Kind to Use Electric Tools to Cut up the Vehicles

A member of the Northport Fire Department uses a battery-powered cutting tool during the Chuck Varese Vehicle Extrication Tournament at Steer’s Pit in Northport on May 14. Not only was it the first time that battery-powered tools were used in this tournament, the Chuck Varese Vehicle Extrication Tournament was the first Long Island tournament of its kind to use these electric tools to cut up the vehicles.
Representatives from Gershow Recycling joined members of the Northport Fire Department and local elected officials at the Chuck Varese Vehicle Extrication Tournament at Steer’s Pit in Northport on May 14. Pictured (left to right): Ernest Pucillo, Trustee, Village of Northport; Doug Pyne, Chief, Northport Fire Department; Joseph Sabia, Trustee, Village of Northport; Andrew Raia, Town Clerk, Town of Huntington; Robert J. “Beefy” Varese, Ex-Chief, Northport Fire Department and his wife, Lt. Jeanne Varese, Co-Coordinators, Chuck Varese Vehicle Extrication Tournament; Donna Koch, Mayor, Village of Northport; Keith Brown, New York State Assemblyman; Dave Weber, Jr., and Meghan Dolan, Trustees, Village of Northport; Richard D’Angelo, Manager, Gershow Recycling’s Huntington facility; and Dr. Dave Bennardo, Councilman, Town of Huntington.

In support of local fire departments, Gershow Recycling donated the use of 30 cars for the Chuck Varese Vehicle Extrication Tournament, which was held at the Northport Fire Department’s Training Grounds at Steer’s Pit in Northport on May 14. Gershow also donated the use of its Huntington facility to enable teams to practice in the week leading up to the tournament.

Twenty teams from thirteen fire departments participated in the tournament, which involved groups of five firefighters working to extricate a “victim” from a “crash” using the Jaws of Life. This year marked the first time the firefighters used battery-powered tools during the extrication exercises; the Chuck Varese Vehicle Extrication Tournament was the first such tournament to bring in electric tools.

Each team was judged on the amount of time it took to perform the extrication, the handling of equipment and the safety procedures they followed. The top three teams were:

  • 1st Place — Northport FD Team #1 (7 minutes, 52 seconds)
  • 2nd Place — Ridge FD (8 minutes, 15 seconds)
  • 3rd Place — North Bellmore FD (8 minutes, 25 seconds)

After the tournament, the vehicles were brought back to Gershow’s facility, where they were shredded and recycled.

Gershow has nine locations in Brooklyn, New Hyde Park, Valley Stream, Freeport, Lindenhurst, Huntington Station, Bay Shore, Medford and Riverhead. For more information, call (631) 289-6188 or visit www.gershow.com.

###

About Gershow Recycling

Started in 1964 by Sam Gershowitz, Gershow Recycling began as a two-man operation with a tractor and trailer, a boom truck and the first portable car flattener. Now with the second generation carrying on the legacy, Gershow generates over 750 jobs, contributing millions of dollars to the local economy, while helping to preserve Long Island’s environment. Gershow Recycling takes aluminum, brass, copper, steel, cast iron, appliances, cars and vehicles. In keeping with its philosophy of “Conserving the Future by Recycling the Past,” Gershow Recycling purchases scrap metal that would have otherwise wound up in local landfills, and turns them into high-quality scrap products for recycling. The company produces both ferrous and non-ferrous products.

Local Youth Robotics Team to be Recognized as a Finalist at the 2022 FIRST® LEGO® League Global Innovation Award presented by Qualcomm

Team #39029 “TriTech” from Dix Hills will be one of the finalists at the 2022 FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) LEGO® League Global Innovation Award presented by Qualcomm, which will take place at Union Station in St. Louis, Missouri on June 21-23.
[KINGS PARK, NEW YORK] [MAY 10, 2022] – FIRST® LEGO® League announced the 20 finalist teams advancing to the 2022 FIRST LEGO League Global Innovation Award presented by Qualcomm Incorporated. Team #39029 “TriTech” from Dix Hills was selected from tens of thousands of teams in more than 110 countries for their outstanding Innovation Project. Their solution has demonstrated strong design and innovation and the potential to add significant value in the world. TriTech has invented the SCOUTbot for the CARGO CONNECT℠ season. Teams were challenged to design a creative new piece of technology or improve an existing one to help cargo along its journey. The team will join other finalists in St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. at the historic Union Station to showcase their invention, participate in workshops, be judged by innovation, patent, and industry experts, and be exposed to career pathways in innovation on June 21-23, 2022.

On June 23 at 5:30 p.m. CT on the FIRSTtv Twitch channel, the Global Innovation Award will culminate with a live awards show, hosted by youth and featuring a live innovation activity. One winning team will be chosen. Additional awards will be given to two runners up, winners for impact, design, create, and implementation, and the publicly voted Community Choice.

Teams participating in the FIRST LEGO League Global Innovation Award must consider possible barriers to implementation, document the evaluation of their invention, and validate their design with professionals working in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math).

Innovators, inventors, and entrepreneurs play a critical role in growing our economy and improving our quality of life. FIRST® and Qualcomm believe a more connected and inclusive world relies on providing today’s youth with equitable access and opportunity to explore the innovation process and channel their unique perspectives to create unique solutions for a better future. Students emerge as strong visionaries capable of applying innovative thinking to any problem. From improvements to the water cycle, to innovative solutions to waste management, past FIRST LEGO League Innovation Project finalists have brought their inventions to market, received patents, and incorporated as businesses.

FIRST LEGO League is an international program for 9 to 16-year-old children (ages vary by country) created in a partnership between FIRST® and the LEGO® Group in 1998 to get children excited about science and technology – and teach them valuable career and life skills. Children work alongside adult coaches to design, build, and program autonomous LEGO® robots, and create an innovative solution to a real-world problem as part of their research project.

The 2022 FIRST LEGO League Global Innovation Award presented by Qualcomm are sponsored by Collins Aerospace, FedEx, John Deere, and LEGO® Education and in collaboration with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

 

###

About FIRST® 
FIRST® is a robotics community that prepares young people for the future through a suite of inclusive, team-based robotics programs for ages 4-18 (PreK-12) that can be facilitated in school or in structured after-school programs. Boosted by a global support system of volunteers, educators, and sponsors that include over 200 of the Fortune 500 companies, teams operate under a signature set of FIRST Core Values to conduct research, fundraise, design, build, and showcase their achievements during annual challenges. An international not-for-profit organization founded by accomplished inventor Dean Kamen in 1989, FIRST has a proven impact on STEM learning, interest, and skill-building well beyond high school. Alumni of FIRST programs gain access to exclusive scholarships, internships, and other opportunities that create connections and open pathways to a wide variety of careers. Learn more at firstinspires.org.

Dreamland Amusements Returns to Long Island for Summer Carnival Season

Featuring the Empire State Fair at the Nassau Coliseum and the Long Island Fun Fest at Suffolk County Community College’s Grant Campus

This spring and summer, Dreamland Amusements is bringing back family fun back to Long Island and the metropolitan New York area with rides, games and special attractions. Dreamland’s Long Island summer season kicks off this Thursday at the Broadway Commons Mall, located at 358 N. Broadway Commons in Hicksville. Its schedule also features the production of two major events: the Empire State Fair, from June 30 to July 10 at the Nassau Live Center, home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, and the Long Island Fun Fest, which will take place from June 9-26 at the Suffolk County Community College Michael J. Grant campus.

The full schedule includes:

  • May 5-15 — Broadway Commons Mall Carnival, 358 N. Broadway Commons, Hicksville
  • May 19-22 — Arthur Henderson Park and Pool, 123 West Merrick Road, Valley Stream
  • May 26-30 — Behind P.C. Richard & Son, 2999 Hempstead Turnpike, Levittown
  • May 26-30 — Merrick LIRR Station, Sunrise Highway, Merrick
  • June 1-5 — Astoria Park, 19th Street (between Astoria Park S. and Ditmars Boulevard), Astoria
  • June 2-5 — 999 Herricks Road, New Hyde Park
  • June 8-12 — Mall at the Source, 1500 Old Country Road, Westbury
  • June 9-26 — Long Island Fun Fest, Suffolk County Community College, Michael J. Grant Campus (Exit 53 off the LIE)
  • June 16-26 — South Shore Mall Carnival, 1701 Sunrise Highway, Bay Shore
  • June 29-July 4 — Broadway Commons Mall Carnival, 358 N. Broadway Commons, Hicksville
  • June 30-July 10 — Empire State Fair, Nassau Live Center, home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Turnpike, Uniondale
  • July 7-10 — Lynbrook Lions Carnival, Greis Park, 55 Wilbur Street (off Sunrise Highway), Lynbrook

Long Island is especially important to Dreamland’s owners, Kathy and Bob DeStefano, since they make their home in Stony Brook, when they are not on the road with the two carnival units they operate with two of their three children and a son-in-law. In 2020, they did not operate on Long Island due to the COVID-19 lockdown; in 2021, they operated on a limited schedule. 2022 is the first full season in which they have been able to plan and promote their events on Long Island.

“Needless to say, the last few years have been difficult for carnival and other amusement and family entertainment operators, but it has been uplifting to see so many familiar faces come out to enjoy our events this year,” Bob DeStefano, Co-Owner, Dreamland Amusements, said.

Each festival will feature rides for both the thrill seeker and young children and their families. In addition to rides, Dreamland’s carnivals also feature games, craft vendors and a wide variety of traditional carnival food.

“We’re looking forward to being on Long Island this year,” Mr. DeStefano said. “The Empire State Fair and the Fun Fest are guaranteed to be among the largest, family fun-oriented events of the season.”

For more information, call 1-866-666-FAIR or visit www.dreamlandamusements.com.

 

###

 

About Dreamland Amusements

Dreamland Amusements carries over 50 rides to service the east coast of the United States, including Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, District of Columbia, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine. It also supplies games, food stands, silent generators, benches and covered seating areas for county and state fairs, private parties, corporate rentals and concert dates. For more information, call 1-866-666-FAIR or visit www.dreamlandamusements.com.

Area Youth Recognized for Teamwork and Innovation at FIRST® LEGO® League Challenge Long Island Tournament

[KINGS PARK, NEW YORK] [APRIL 28, 2022] –Contestants ages 9 to 14 took part in the annual FIRST® LEGO® League Challenge Long Island Tournament, which was sponsored by School-Business Partnerships of Long Island, Inc. (SBPLI) and held remotely on March 13 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Team #23785 “Meteorites Squared” from Hicksville won the Champion’s Award. The top teams won by embodying the program’s Core Values of teamwork and mutual respect while achieving excellence and innovation in both a robot game and innovative project.

FIRST LEGO League Challenge is an international program for 9- to 16-year-old children (ages vary by country) created in a partnership between FIRST and the LEGO Group in 1998 to get children excited about science and technology — and teach them valuable career and life skills. Children work alongside adult Mentors to design, build, and program autonomous robots using LEGO® Education SPIKETM Prime or LEGO® MINDSTORMS® and create an innovative solution to a problem as part of their Innovation Project.

This year’s Challenge — CARGO CONNECTSM — called for teams to reimagine our global transportation system and explore ways of improving how we access and deliver needed and desired goods, making all communities more connected.

Twenty-one teams took part in the Tournament. The competition is judged in three areas: Innovation Project; Robot Design, and Core Values, which embody aspects of teamwork and good sportsmanship. Top robot game scores are also honored. The award winners were as follows:

Team Award

Team #

Team Name

Town

Global Innovation Award Nomination

22112

Portledge Royal Panthers

Locust Valley

Global Innovation Award Nomination

6435

Fire Dragons

Rocky Point

Innovation Project 1st Place Winner

39029

TriTech **

Dix Hills

Innovation Project 2nd Finalist

2180

LJHS LE’GO Lions (Holborow)

Middle Island

Innovation Project 3rd Finalist

51732

Dragon Racers

Huntington

Innovation Project 4th Finalist

30052

Team 4×4

Glen Head

Robot Design 1st Place Winner

22112

Portledge Royal Panthers

Locust Valley

Robot Design 2nd Finalist

15794

Buckley Cyber Dogs

Roslyn

Robot Design 3rd Finalist

1087

Brainstormers

Bayport

Robot Design 4th Finalist

46635

Brickaneers Gold

Islip

Robot Performance 1st Place Winner

50946

Overpowered Spicy Robot

Syosset

Robot Performance 2nd Place

54838

Overpowered Chicken Nugget

Syosset

Robot Performance 3rd Place

1087

Brainstormers

Bayport

Robot Performance 4th Place

46635

Brickaneers Gold

Islip

Core Values 1st Place Winner

16174

Meteorites

Hicksville

Core Values 2nd Finalist

47463

Raptor Dactyls

East Islip

Core Values 3rd Finalist

54370

BRICKii

Stony Brook

Core Values 4th Finalist

50815

Brickaneers Duplo

Islip

Rising All-Star 1st Place Winner

53114

Robat

Jericho

Rising All-Star 2nd Finalist

43820

Robotic Lightning Kangaroos

Huntington

Rising All-Star 3rd Finalist

49289

Electric Eagles

Jericho

Engineering Excellence 1st Place Winner

37506

Microchip Cookies

Plainview

Engineering Excellence 2nd Finalist

2438

Camol Clan

Floral Park

Engineering Excellence 3rd Finalist

8085

Rocky Point Radical Robotix

Rocky Point

Champion’s Award 1st Place Winner *

23785

Meteorites Squared

Hicksville

Champion’s Award 2nd Finalist

6435

Fire Dragons ***

Rocky Point

Champion’s Award 3rd Finalist

53744

Imagination in a Nutshell

Jericho

Champion’s Award 4th Finalist

50946

Overpowered Spicy Robot

Syosset

* The Champions Award winner was invited to participate in the FIRST LEGO League Challenge World Festival at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston, Texas on April 20-23, 2022.

** This team has been invited to participate in the American Invitational Robotics Competition at the Liberty Science Center in Jersey City, New Jersey on May 14.

*** This team has been invited to participate in the FIRST LEGO League Razorback Open Invitational at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, Arkansas on May 19-22, 2022.

 

The Coach/Mentor Award went to four coaches. The 1st Place Winner was Catherine Temps of Team #16174 “Meteorites” from Hicksville. Dave Savage from Team #48026 “Savage Bricks” from East Setauket was the 2nd Finalist, and Shannen Delaney of Team #43820 “Robotic Lightning Kangaroos” from Huntington was the 3rd Finalist. The 4th Finalist was Paola Ragusa of Team #2438 “Camol Clan” from Floral Park.

For more information on SBPLI, visit https://www.sbpli-lifirst.org.

###

About FIRST® 
Accomplished inventor Dean Kamen founded FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) in 1989 to inspire an appreciation of science and technology in young people. Based in Manchester, N.H., FIRST designs accessible, innovative programs to build self-confidence, knowledge, and life skills while motivating young people to pursue opportunities in science, technology, and engineering. With support from over 200 of the Fortune 500 companies and more than $50 million in college scholarships, the not-for-profit organization hosts the FIRST® Robotics Competition for students in Grades 9-12; FIRST® Tech Challenge for Grades 7-12; and FIRST® LEGO® League for Grades PreK-8. Gracious Professionalism® is a way of doing things that encourages high-quality work, emphasizes the value of others, and respects individuals and the community. To learn more about FIRST, go to www.firstinspires.org

 

About FIRST® LEGO League

FIRST LEGO League introduces science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) to children ages 4-16 (ages vary by country) through fun, exciting hands-on learning. FIRST LEGO League participants gain real-world problem-solving experiences through a guided, global robotics program, helping today’s students and teachers build a better future together. In FIRST LEGO League, students engage in hands-on STEM experiences, building confidence, growing their knowledge and developing habits of learning. FIRST LEGO League’s three divisions inspire youth to experiment and grow their critical thinking, coding and design skills through hands-on STEM learning and robotics.

 

FIRST LEGO League Discover – PreK- Grade 1:

For children ages 4-6, this playful introductory STEM program ignites their natural curiosity and builds their habits of learning with hands-on activities in the classroom and at home using LEGO® Duplo bricks.

 

FIRST LEGO League Explore – Grades 2-4:

In Explore, teams of students ages 6-10 focus on the fundamentals of engineering as they explore real-world problems, learn to design and code and create unique solutions made with LEGO bricks and powered by LEGO Education WeDo 2.0.

 

FIRST LEGO League Challenge – Grades 4-8:

Friendly competition is at the heart of Challenge, as teams of students ages 9-16* engage in research, problem-solving, coding and engineering – building and programming a LEGO robot that navigates the missions of a robot game. As part of Challenge, teams also participate in a research project to identify and solve a relevant real-world problem.

 

About School-Business Partnerships of Long Island, Inc.

School-Business Partnerships of Long Island, Inc. (SBPLI) DBA FIRST® Long Island is a fully volunteer-run 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in 1984 by Fred Breithut with the goal of developing partnerships between local high schools and businesses. His goal was to provide students with practical experience and curriculum development, while helping the business community develop its future workforce, which resulted in the formation of over 100 partnerships. In 1999, SBPLI brought the FIRST® (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) to Long Island, which featured just eight FIRST® Robotics Competition high school teams. Since then, the Long Island Regional FIRST® Robotics Competition has grown to two events with over 80 teams competing each year. SBPLI also hosts Long Island’s annual FIRST® LEGO League Qualifying and Championship Tournaments and the FIRST® LEGO League Junior Expos, in which over 2,000 elementary and middle school students from Nassau and Suffolk Counties take part each year. In 2016, SBPLI added the FIRST® Tech Challenge to its roster of programs. For more information about the programs, or to learn how to become a sponsor, visit www.sbpli-lifirst.org.

 

Eastern Suffolk BOCES Chief Operating Officer Julie Lutz, Ph.D. Discusses the Changes to Public Education on Long Island at LIMBA

On March 11, Julie Lutz, Ph.D., Chief Operating Officer, Eastern Suffolk BOCES, spoke at LIMBA’s (Long Island Metro Business Action) virtual meeting on the topic “Public Education on Long Island: Shifting Demographics, Costs & Outcomes. Why It Matters?”

During her presentation, Dr. Lutz described the shifts in Long Island schools over the past decade. While school districts such as Central Islip, Riverhead, Brentwood and Wyandanch have seen increases in enrollment, the number of students enrolled in Suffolk County public schools overall dropped 12.1%, according to Dr. Lutz.

Between the 2012-13 and 2020-21 school years, the number of children considered to be “economically disadvantaged” was up 27.4%. “Even wealthier school districts fell into this,” she said, adding that Long Island school districts saw a 27.2% bump in economically disadvantaged students, compared to a 6.1% increase throughout the rest of the state.

In addition, there has been “a growing number of English Language Learners” (ELL) in Suffolk’s schools, Dr. Lutz said. In fact, the number of ELL students increased 66.6% from 2010-11 to 2020-21. As of October 2020, there were 42,163 ELLs on Long Island, which is 18.2% of the state’s total ELL population (including New York City). For students with disabilities, the number in Suffolk rose 7.3%, compared to 6.8% on Long Island, 6.0% in Nassau and 3.7% for the rest of the state.

In explaining the differences between wealthy and poor school districts, Dr. Lutz said that 61.4% of Suffolk students attend a district of below average wealth. Among ESBOCES districts, that figure is 69.4%, and it is 45.5% among Western Suffolk BOCES districts. In addition, 1.1% of students experienced homelessness at some point during the school year, compared to 0.9% for the rest of the state (excluding New York City and Long Island).

Dr. Lutz also pointed out that the least wealthy districts on Long Island are majority-minority; 67.7% are Hispanic and 20.7% are Black. The wealthiest districts, meanwhile, are 54.6% white, 22.2% are Hispanic and only 3.5% Black.

Dr. Lutz said that “parents come to Long Island for the educational quality.” During her presentation, she pointed out that, in 2020, the graduation rate was 91.5% on Long Island, compared to Suffolk County (90.3%), the rest of the state (87.5%) and New York State outside of New York City (88.7%). Furthermore, of the Long Island students who graduate, 86% go on to college.

Long Island school districts graduate a high percentage of students with Advanced Regents diplomas — 58.4%, compared to the rest of the state at 38.9%, according to Dr. Lutz. “If Long Island were its own state,” she said, “we would be number one in the nation in the number of 2022 Regeneron Science Talent Search semifinalists with 49.” That would be greater than California (45) and the rest of New York (44).

Eighty to 90 percent of the students in ESBOCES’ career and technical training programs go on to higher education. “This dispels the myth that students in our schools don’t go to college,” Dr. Lutz said. “These students are getting trained [in the trades] and are able to get job offers [after graduation]. There is sometimes a hurdle students need to jump over to get into the BOCES program, but these programs keep giving students a leg up.”

The problem is that Long Island is short changed when it comes to school aid from Albany. “The share of state aid to Long Island is 12.5%, but we educate 15.8% of the state’s children,” Dr. Lutz said. “Long Island needs its fair share of state aid. More money is coming from our pockets. Not only do we get less, but the purchasing power [of the state aid money] is also less.”

According to Dr. Lutz, over two-thirds of the schools’ revenues on Long Island are funded by property taxes. “As a result, we see many families moving to other parts of the country that are more affordable,” Dr. Lutz said.

For more information about upcoming LIMBA programs, visit https://limba.net.

###

About LIMBA
Since 1968, LIMBA (Long Island Metro Business Action) has been Long Island’s catalyst for economic investment and improvement, sponsoring lively breakfast forums featuring Long Island business activists and government officials. Its mission is to promote and address issues that affect the quality of life on Long Island. For more information, call (631) 757-1698 or visit www.limba.net.

What’s Happening at PRMG

  • Menus were designed for The Village Raw Bar and Piccolo Mondo Ristorante.
  • Advertisements were created for LAXWORX, Bens Deli, Briscoe, Crasche and Star Island Shark Tournament.
  • Mailers were created for Dreamland Amusements.
  • A Brochure was created for Star Island Shark Tournament.

Contact Us

For more information about our services or to find out how we can help you attain your marketing goals, click here to email us, or call:
Toll Free: 855-PRMG-123 .: Phone: 631-207-1057

Skip to content